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Supermumma Stories

Kate's Story

Kate's Story
The first 24 months of my new life as a mother were the hardest. I have never been tested in the way that this new role has tested me. Most of it I could cope with; the pooing and spewing everywhere, the washing, the days without showers and living on snacks as meal. It was the sleep that nearly killed me. The baby’s sleep and my sleep!! Both were severely lacking. I have never experienced anything like the feelings that come with sleep deprivation.

Lisa's Story

Lisa's Story

I get induced as bubs is getting into a not such a good state, neither am I, and bubs is posterior so its agonising. I literally can’t breath and beg for an epidural. By this state I can’t even take a deep breath to hold still inbetween contractions because there is no time so I’m held down and ‘oooh yea feel some relief’. Not a full epidural because the babies in distress and we need all hands on deck. By the time it comes to push I have 15 doctors in the room and a guy vacuuming out my baby while I push and yes ‘scream’!

Out he finally comes… not really breathing and not crying onto my chest… then taken swiftly from me as the large gathering of doctors work on him and then he is taken up to the neonatal ward. I’m left drained, and sore, throwing up in a bag, wondering if he is even gonna make it. I get wheel chaired up to the ward later to see him attached to tubes and in a nappy… but alive!

Time moves on and my son is diagnosed with Autism. Again life tests me and continues to to this very day. After a period of grieving, I summon the strength only mums have and deal with that shit.

In the meantime my marriage is crumbling. Autism, Tourette’s tics, hyperactivity, sibling rivalry, lack of sleep, stress, lack of making time for each other, and lack of time for each other, feeling alone and scared, I am pushed to my absolute limits over and over again.

No one can help me or make it all better…

Ellice's Story

Ellice's Story
My pregnancy journey with Jesse was what you'd call... SHORT! From the time I found out I was pregnant to when I gave birth was only 13 short weeks! You see... I didn't know I was pregnant. Yep, I'm that crazy lady everyone asks, 'but, how did you not know?!'

Laura's Story - Part One

Laura's Story - Part One
After 4 months in Brisbane, 3 months in NICU and 4 weeks in PICU we were finally received a diagnosis. I still remember this day vividly. Zoe was diagnosed with a congenital myopathy. She had two mutations on her RYR1 gene that resulted in her weak and floppy muscles and poor breathing. We were told that Zoe’s genetic disease was rare and the only known case of its severity. Of the mutations that Zoe has, one has never been seen before and the other only a handful of times. Given this situation we were told that Zoe would pass away from respiratory failure most likely before her first birthday. This was the diagnosis we had feared since the day that Zoe was born. It was an incredibly emotional and difficult time.

Laura's Story - Part Two

Laura's Story - Part Two

I wrote the first part of my story back in May 2017 when I was experiencing my third miscarriage. I was so broken, it was all so much at once, the anniversary of Zoe’s death, a miscarriage, bereaved mother’s day, mother’s day. I took a lot of time off from my job because I just couldn’t function I did not have it in me.


I also underwent investigations in to my reasons for recurrent miscarriage in May/June of 2017. I wasn’t expecting much to come out of this, I was certain it was just our luck. Those investigations found that I am a heterozygous carrier of the MFTHR gene mutation which has been linked to recurrent pregnancy loss as well as other pregnancy complications. It was also found that my ovarian reserve was low, not a major cause for concern but as I was not ready to try to conceive again it was recommended to go back on birth control.

Turns out I never got a repeat on my script and I couldn’t get in to my doctor to get a prescription in time for me to take the pills correctly. So we decided to be careful and to not not try… I fell pregnant the one time we slipped, there are a lot of people that say it always happens when you least expect it. 

Being pregnant again was such a mix of emotions. I was excited and terrified, so anxious about how things would progress.

Kara's Story

Kara's Story
For the second and third nights at home, we had a very unhappy and unsettled baby. He just cried and cried so in desperation I would just put him on my breast. Which in hindsight was the right thing to do. Technically it was cluster feeding right? So the more I fed him should have meant more milk right? Not for us. There was nothing there for him and after a few minutes he would come off and cry. Our poor tiny boy, we had no idea what was wrong or how to help him.

Laura's Story

Laura's Story
My journey to motherhood is an interesting one and also very long, spanning nearly 7 years. In that time my husband and I have experienced the best day of our lives and also the most devastating.

Catherine's Story

Catherine's Story
Then we came to our 20 week scan. My husband got the time off work to come and see our little human on the screen. Heartbeat – check. Brain size and formation – check. Spine – check. Internal organs – check. The scan went on. Face. Eyes. Lips. Nose. Arms. Fingers. Legs. Feet. Lips. Nose. Lips. Nose. I watched the technician as she went back and forth from my babies limbs to its face. Lips, nose, lips, nose. I asked if there was something wrong. She just looked at me. “Just give me a minute” she said. We had no idea what was going on. Eventually she came back and had one more look. Then silence.

Kim's Story

Kim's Story

I was devastated when they told me I’d have to stay a few more days. It was just too hard having the little guy at the hospital with me, so he visited and breastfed during the day, and went home at night. I would express milk at night and send it home for the next night’s feeds. Being separated from my tiny baby was awful. My breasts were confused, and I kept thinking I could hear him crying, even though he wasn’t there. Setting alarms to wake up and express milk during the night was no fun either. I just wanted to go home. 

 

After a week in hospital, x-rays, CT scans, daily blood and urine tests, an MRI and a kidney biopsy, I was diagnosed with Microscopic Polyangiitis, an autoimmune disease that had really taken its toll on my kidneys.  

 

I needed to start treatment of Prednisolone (a steroid) and Cyclophosphamide (a chemotherapy drug). The Dr explained that the treatment may reduce my chances of conceiving more children. And that I would have to stop breastfeeding. That’s when I broke down.... "

Supermumma Stories

Supermumma Stories
When I was a little girl every Friday night my entire family (I’m talking about 30people!) would all head over to my Oma's house. The men would dr...
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